About Us

Today, with more than 20 outpatient clinics, a hospital, and an Emergency Care Center, UT Health Science Center sees more than 138,500 outpatient visits and more than 3,700 inpatient stays each year.

The rich history of UT Health Science Center goes back to World War II. The site where the Health Science Center stands today was once part of Camp Fannin, an infantry training center which prepared more than 100,000 men a year for combat.

For more information about UT Health Science Center or Camp Fannin, please contact the Office of Public Affairs at 903-877-7075.

Fast Facts

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Institution

  • In 1977, UT Health Northeast joined The University of Texas System. It is one of six academic medical centers in The University of Texas System and is governed by the UT System Board of Regents.
  • UT Health Northeast is dedicated to providing patient care, research, and education in the treatment of pulmonary and heart disease. Its mission is to serve East Texas and beyond through excellent patient care and community health, comprehensive education, and innovative research.
  • UT Health Northeast consists of a 109-bed hospital and associated outpatient clinics, with about 100 faculty members, including physicians in residency programs.
  • UT Health Northeast employs more than 800 people. The main campus is located on 614 acres northeast of Tyler, Texas. Dr. Kirk A. Calhoun is the president of UT Health Northeast.
  • The UT Health Northeast budget for fiscal year 2009, which ended in August 2009, was $112 million. The state of Texas funds roughly one-third of UT Health Northeast’s budget; the rest comes from income generated by health care services, government grants, and private donations.
  • Research spending in fiscal year 2009 totaled more than $14 million.
  • The Health Science Center has an annual economic impact on East Texas of more than $300 million.

Patient Care

  • UT Health Northeast has about 70 clinical faculty in more than 25 medical specialties, as well as 32 research faculty. Its core medical areas are pulmonology, cardiology, oncology, primary care, occupational medicine, and surgery.
  • A recent study by HealthGrades, the leading independent healthcare ratings organization, found that UT Health Northeast is among the top 10 percent of hospitals in the nation for pulmonary care.
  • UT Health Northeast received the 2010 Pulmonary Care Excellence Award, as well as Five-Star Ratings for treatment of pneumonia and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD. It also received the 2009/2010 Outstanding Patient Experience Award, placing it in the top 5 percent of hospitals nationwide for providing exemplary service to patients.
  • In 2009, UT Health Northeast was recognized – for the third time in four years – for its care of patients with coronary artery disease and heart failure by the AHA/ASAs “Get With the Guidelines” program. UT Health Northeast is one of just 15 Texas hospitals and 106 U.S. hospitals to receive the Gold Award from the AHA/ASA in coronary artery disease. UT Health Northeast has provided state-of-the-art cardiovascular services since 1981. In 1983, UT Health Northeast physicians performed the first open-heart surgery in East Texas.
  • UT Health Northeast is a world-renowned center of pulmonary and infectious disease treatment and research, with physicians who are experts at treating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), emphysema, asthma, tuberculosis, and nontuberculous mycobacterial diseases.
  • In 2003, the Texas Legislature designated UT Health Northeast as the East Texas Center for Rural Geriatric Studies, now called the Center for Healthy Aging. The Center’s purpose is to improve the quality of life for aging Americans in rural and non-metropolitan areas through research, public health and outreach, education, public policy and advocacy, and clinical services.
  • UT Health Northeast’s Center for Pulmonary and Infectious Disease Control provides a toll-free infectious disease consulting service to all Texas physicians and health care agencies throughout the state.
  • UT Health Northeast is home to the Public Health Laboratory of East Texas, a joint effort between UT Health Northeast and the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS). The lab has specialized equipment and facilities needed to identify and analyze microbes that cause infectious disease.

Research

  • Our researchers are investigating the aging process, studying how to curb the immune system to prevent the rejection of transplanted organs, exploring how to stop tuberculosis infection, and analyzing the blood-clotting process.
  • In 2005, UT Health Northeast received the largest government-funded research award in its history: a five-year grant of almost $7.8 million from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study lung scarring. Lung scarring kills about 40,000 Americans each year.
  • During fiscal year 2009, our 32 biomedical researchers worked on more than 60 projects funded by over $14 million worth of grants from federal agencies such as the NIH or private sources such as the American Heart Association.
  • About 90 percent of UT Health Northeast researchers are externally funded.
  • In fall 2008, UT Health Northeast, in partnership with The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, was chosen to conduct the National Children’s Study in Lamar County, Texas. The study, the largest of its kind in the United States, will examine the effects of environmental and genetic factors on child and adult health. The national project will follow 100,000 children from before birth to age 21, tracking information on health issues such as asthma, birth defects, diabetes, heart disease, and obesity. The study will receive more than $15 million to spearhead data-gathering and research efforts in Lamar County, home to Paris, Texas.

Education

  • UT Health Northeast has residency programs in family medicine and occupational medicine, as well as master’s degree programs in biotechnology and environmental science in conjunction with Stephen F. Austin State University in Nacogdoches.
  • In May 2005, to further its educational mission, the 79th Texas Legislature gave UT Health Northeast degree-granting authority.
  • UT Health Northeast oversees the Heartland National TB Center, a joint project between UT Health Northeast and the Texas Department of State Health Services. The Heartland Center is funded by a five-year, $7.5 million grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Beginning in 2005, it has provided training, technical assistance, and medical consultation for tuberculosis in a 13-state region.
  • In fall 2008, UT Health Northeast, in partnership with The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, was chosen to conduct the National Children’s Study in Lamar County, Texas. The study will examine the effects of environmental and genetic factors on child and adult health. The national project will follow 100,000 children from before birth to age 21, tracking information on health issues such as asthma, birth defects, diabetes, heart disease, and obesity. The study will receive more than $15 million to spearhead data-gathering and research efforts in Lamar County, home to Paris, Texas.
  • In 2005, UT Health Northeast’s Southwest Center for Pediatric Environmental Health (SWCPEH) was one of 15 organizations in the nation to receive the first Children’s Environmental Health Excellence Award from the Environmental Protection Agency. SWCPEH educates health professionals and community groups about environmental health issues and their impact on children’s health. It also provides clinical consultations for patients through their personal physicians or public health clinics.
  • Since 1995, the Southwest Center for Agricultural Health, Injury Prevention, and Education has worked with stakeholders in farming, fishing, and forestry to improve workplace health and safety in Texas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Louisiana to research and develop ways to reduce occupational disease and injury. In 2006, it was part of a consortium that received a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health grant to help develop and launch a national public health campaign to prevent deaths and serious injuries from tractor-related accidents.

History

  • The genesis of UT Health Northeast at Tyler was the 1,074-bed U.S. Army hospital at Camp Fannin, a World War II infantry-training base that was activated in 1943 and prepared more than 100,000 men for combat. During the height of the war, Camp Fannin’s troop capacity was about 18,000 soldiers. The camp also served as a prisoner of war camp.
  • When Camp Fannin was closed after the war ended, the hospital and 614 acres of the camp were donated to the state of Texas. Today’s UT Health Northeast is located on those 614 acres.
  • UT Health Northeast was established in 1947 by the Texas Legislature as the East Texas Tuberculosis Sanatorium. It accepted its first patients in 1949.
  • The 62nd Texas Legislature renamed the institution the East Texas Chest Hospital in 1971, and designated it a primary referral facility in Texas for treatment of pulmonary and heart disease.

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